Virtual SAN Observer

The VMware Virtual SAN Observer is currently the best monitoring and troubleshooting tool for Virtual SAN that is available today. The tool is utilized for monitoring performance statistics for Virtual SAN live or offline.The Virtual SAN Observer UI depends on a couple of JavaScript and CSS libraries (JQuery, d3, angular, bootstrap, font-awesome) in order successfully display the performance statistics and their information.

These library files are access and loaded during runtime when the Virtual SAN Observer page is rendered. The tool requires access to the libraries mentioned above in order to work correctly. This means that the vCenter Server requires access to the internet. This requirement can potentially present a challenge in secured environments where applications with access to the internet is not be a practical form of operation and its not allowed.

Many vSphere admins have encountered this issue. In particular, those supporting secured environments. In order to overcome this issue, the vCenter Server Appliance can be modified so that it can access the required files and library locally.

Currently experiencing problems displaying the information on this post due to my WordPress upgrade. Please follow this link below to view the full article and instructions on how to configure the VMware Virtual SAN Observer in offline mode.

For more information on Virtual SAN Observer download the white paper Monitoring VMware Virtual SAN with Virtual SAN Observer.

Special thanks to our awesome engineers Mousumi Mullick and Christian Dickmann for helping out with all of this Virtual SAN Observer greatness!!

– Enjoy

For future updates on Virtual SAN (VSAN), Virtual Volumes (VVols), and other Software-defined Storage technologies as well as vSphere + OpenStack be sure to follow me on Twitter: @PunchingClouds

 

VSAN-ExchAs we continue to showcase the value and capabilities of Virtual SAN, I believe it is crucial to provide access to the information VMware’s performance engineering team has gathered around business critical applications and their respective performance benchmarks.

This white paper focuses on Microsoft Exchange Server performance on VMware Virtual SAN. Microsoft Exchange Server is a commonly found email server and is considered a business-critical application by many organizations. Virtualized instances of Exchange Server can be successfully deployed using VMware vSphere 5.5 and it has been shown that Exchange Server performs well in a virtualized environment with shared SAN storage .

With the release of VMware Virtual SAN, the next logical step is to study the performance of Exchange Server on this storage platform. VMware performance testing shows that Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 on Virtual SAN clusters scales well without affecting much user-perceived application latency as more Exchange users are deployed with added VMware Virtual SAN hosts.

Take a look at the white paper and review the results of this study.

– Enjoy

For future updates on Virtual SAN (VSAN), Virtual Volumes (VVols), and other Software-defined Storage technologies as well as vSphere + OpenStack be sure to follow me on Twitter: @PunchingClouds

Virtual SAN LogoThe VMware Storage and Availability team is looking for customer and community feedback for VMware Virtual SAN. Please take a few minutes to fill out the survey listed in the link below.

VMware Virtual SAN Survey Link

Thank you for your help and support.

For future updates on Virtual SAN (VSAN), Virtual Volumes (VVols), and other Software-defined Storage technologies as well as vSphere + OpenStack be sure to follow me on Twitter: @PunchingClouds

 

VVols-LogoIn case you didn’t get a chance to attend VMworld this past week in San Francisco, there were a lot great sessions delivered on different types of products and technologies. One of my sessions made it into the VMworld top 10 lists “Virtual Volumes Deep Dive”.  The session was well received and it was actually published on YouTube.

Just in case you’re new to Virtual Volumes, here is a brief overview of what it is:

Virtual Volumes is a new virtual machine disk management and integration framework that exposes virtual disks as native storage objects onto storage arrays that enables array-based operations at the virtual disk level.

Virtual Volumes transforms the data plane of SAN/NAS storage systems by aligning storage consumptions and operations with virtual machines. In other words, Virtual Volumes makes SAN/NAS storage systems VM-aware and unlocks the ability to leverage array based data services and storage array capabilities with a VM-centric approach at the granularity of a single virtual disk.

With Virtual Volumes, most of the data operations are offloaded to the storage arrays. New data management operations, and communication mechanism have been implemented to manage required communications between vSphere, storage arrays and the Virtual Volumes.

- Enjoy

For future updates on Virtual SAN (VSAN), Virtual Volumes (VVols), and other Software-defined Storage technologies as well as vSphere + OpenStack be sure to follow me on Twitter: @PunchingClouds

VSAN-DBAs we continue to showcase the value and capabilities of Virtual SAN, I believe it is crucial to provide access to the information VMware’s performance engineering team has gathered around business critical applications and their respective performance benchmarks.

This new white paper focuses on Microsoft SQL Server workload performance on VMware Virtual SAN. The study was performed with the used of the DVD Store benchmark application utilizing Virtual SAN as the storage solution. The tests performed show that VMware vSphere 5.5 with Virtual SAN is an effective storage platform for transactional database workloads like Microsoft SQL Server.

- Enjoy

For future updates on Virtual SAN (VSAN), Virtual Volumes (VVols), and other Software-defined Storage technologies as well as vSphere + OpenStack be sure to follow me on Twitter: @PunchingClouds